GRAY, Tenn. -

After 57 years on the radio waves across the hills of western North Carolina and East Tennessee, the man behind an iconic voice made his final broadcast Friday.

Dave Hogan's start in radio came at 12-years-old when he used a coffee can to broadcast his voice. The perfect pitch seems like something he's just always had a knack for.

"It's best if you just be natural, and that's what I've tried to, and use my natural voice," Hogan said.

Natural and genuine is a man who connects with the audience like family. That's something his co-host Carl Swann has watched him do for seven years now.

"Because of the radio show, they feel like they know him. In many ways, they do. Dave, I'll tell you, never met a stranger," Swann added

Hogan learned the strategy on air from his father.

"When you shuck it down to the cob, it's just a communication business.  You're talking one-on-one with the listener," Hogan said.

Tim Cable will slide in front of the microphone for Hogan's shift, but Cable said he's following a legend.

"They set their clock by Dave and what he says in the morning. They go see the people Dave says for them to go see. Dave has just been a friend to everybody," Cable said.

Hogan has not taken those connections for granted.

"The contribution that you feel like you have made to the community stands out more than anything," Hogan added.

In retirement, Hogan finally getting rid of something that tends to come in the broadcasting world: the deadline.

"I love to fish, and I've always had a deadline, even if the fish are biting, I've had to thrown down my fishing pole and head back to work," Hogan said. "I won't be doing that anymore. If the fish are biting, I'll be staying there as long as they bite."

Along with the fishing pole, he might also have a baseball glove lying around somewhere. Hogan is a huge baseball fan, and he plans to visit as many professional parks as he can. His first stop is Nationals Park in Washington D.C.