News 5 met with Tennessee Congressman Phil Roe Monday in Johnson City to get his opinion of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that private companies do not have to pay for employee birth control if it goes against their religion.    

Roe said, "I think that's a great ruling too. I think that, again, The Constitution limits powers and it says who has those powers.  And, for instance, the 10th Amendment says the powers not specifically given to the federal government in the Constitution are left up to the states or as you the individual."

President Barack Obama wants Congress to assist the women who lose their free contraception because of this decision.

Stewart Harris, a professor at the Appalachian School of Law, says, "Be careful what you wish for because it also applies to Muslims, Jews, Hindus, Buddhists and Agnostics who don't have a particular religion they follow but do have philosophical objections, so we may see other such cases."

The case came to the Supreme Court when Conestoga Wood Specialties of Pennsylvania and Hobby Lobby emphasized their conscientious desire to operate in harmony with biblical principles while competing in a secular marketplace.