(CNN) -

The world's first man-made surfing lake has been given an opening date of summer 2015.

Surf Snowdonia in Wales's Conwy Valley will comprise a 300-meter-long lagoon 10 miles inland, with machines to create waves up to six feet in height.

If you can't wait til then to carve a wave that isn't straight out of a sea-sprayed, sun-bleached postcard, there are other unusual surf experiences out there.

Pororoca (Brazil)

Porocora means "great roar" -- exactly what you hear for 30 minutes before this Amazonian tidal bore rolls into view.

The wave has its own competition -- the National Pororoca Surfing Championship -- and appears between March and April, when the strengthened Atlantic Ocean tide rushes into the Amazon Basin.

How to find it: The bore starts at the point where the Amazon River meets the Atlantic Ocean, but it can travel 800 kilometers (497 miles) inland.

The most popular surf spot is the stretch that passes through Sao Domingos do Capim in Para state, which is served by Belem/Val de Cans---Julio Cezar Ribeiro International Airport, 149 kilometers (92 miles) away.

Standing wave (Munich)

More than 100 surfers ride this standing wave on the Eisbach River every day, but it's not for novices -- the flow rate is about 20 tons per second.

The wave, which reaches a height of two meters, is created by concrete slabs that were placed on the riverbed in the 1970s to weaken the river's flow.

How to find it: The standing wave can be found on the stretch of water that passes through Munich's city center, Englischer Garten (English Garden).

The nearest U-Bahn stop is Hauptbahnhof.

Habitat 67 (Montreal)

In 2002, Olympic kayaker Corran Addison became the first person to the surf St. Lawrence River's standing wave, named after the adjacent housing complex.

Later, he set up a surf school where others could learn to ride the urban wave.

Addison estimates he's taught more than 3,000 students how to surf it.

The wave is created by a river-bottom depression.

Addison is now lobbying to create additional depressions throughout Montreal, with the use of submerged concrete blocks.

How to find it: Habitat 67 -- both the housing complex and the wave named after it -- can be found at Marc-Drouin Quay in the Montreal city center.

Severn Bore (Gloucestershire, UK)

The Severn Bore is created when rising tides in the Bristol Channel force water up the Severn Estuary, creating waves of up to 2.8 meters in height.

The largest bores occur in spring.

Surfers get a ridiculously long hang time -- the record is held by a surfer who rode it for a length of five miles.

"There's something completely mad about riding a muddy, powerful wave up the Severn Estuary, 30 miles inland," says local surfer Phil Williams.