EMBREEVILLE, Tenn. -

When a fire breaks out on the far west end of Washington County, Tennessee the Embreeville Volunteer Fire Department responds. The department is quickly running out of volunteers, however.

There were roughly twice as many members from another department working a fire on Tuesday as there were from Embreeville. "This is the lowest it's been,? said chief Earl Greene. "Usually have 25 or 30 people."

They spelled out the need on the sign in front of the fire hall, but only one person has expressed a slight interest. The Embreeville Volunteer Fire Department has lost more than 30 percent of its members in the past year.

Even some of the new folks to sign up haven't stuck around. ?We've got two in rookie school,? said Greene. ?Should have had five but we had three drop out."

It's the training he's talking about that extinguishes many volunteer's ability to serve. By state law, volunteer firefighters must go through the same training as those who work for paid departments.

"We mainly need firefighters for the daytime, most fire fighters have got daytime jobs," said Greene.

Dylan Harris recently became a junior member of another department in Washington County. ?When I go on the truck, ride the truck I feel like I'm doing a job," said Harris.

He says when he starts rookie school next year, he'll have to re-arrange his college and work schedule to fit in the more than 100 hours of class time. "It does take time, but I still make time for it,? described Harris. ?It?s something I like."

Now the Embreeville Volunteer Fire Department is hoping they'll find their own members like Harris to keep their trucks rolling.