The National Weather Service has confirmed another tornado in our area. It has been a week since storms rolled across Tennessee and Virginia.

The Weather Service says the damage to homes and buildings in Jonesville, Virginia was caused by a tornado, something Alan Bailey, the Lee County Emergency Management Coordinator, understands. "The strength of the storms that went through the area here was very surprising to me."

A lesson learned first hand by Bailey and people living in this scenic part of Jonesville, an area now littered with debris from last Friday's EF-1 tornado.

That twister, just confirmed by the National Weather Service, had winds of about 95-miles per hour. Enough to blow a home on Cooney Hollow Road about 25-feet off its foundation.

From the house being lifted off it's foundation to a barn that's missing, it's certainly an indication of just how strong this storm in Jonesville was.

Something that's still hard for some storm victims like Marty Mullins to believe, even a week later. "I have lived here all my life and there have always been a few shingles knocked off here and there but this is the worst thing i have ever dealt with."

That's not all the damage, the tornado was on the ground for about a mile.

In that relatively short track it also literally blew apart a 40 foot equipment shed.

It tossed a nearly 3-thousand pound steel cage around like a toy, eventually wrapping it around a tree hundreds of feet away. and while the tornado packed a punch, there were some things it didn't move.

Heavy construction equipment used to be inside a garage. The wind took the building, but left that high-dollar equipment.

Equipment that may now be used to help clean-up and build back what was gone with the wind, in a matter of seconds.

Mullins says he doesn't want to experience anything like this ever again. "I always worried more about the river getting up than the wind blowing it away. This is not the place to be in a flood but obviously it's not the place to be in a tornado either."

The National Weather Service will have storm surveyors in Scott County and Washington County, Virginia next week, to determine if damage there was caused by a tornado or straight line winds.